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SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich. —A special meeting of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians Board of Directors is set for Tuesday, June 26, 2018, starting at 4 p.m. at the Sault Kewadin Casino.

On the agenda are resolutions on budgets: Sanitation, Education- TED Grant, Healthy Start Grant, Three Fires Cancer Control Program and Tribal Opioid Prevention Grant; 2018 Great Start to Quality Early Learning Awards; Racial/Ethnic Approaches to Community Health; Secured Credit and Drug Free Workplace- Random Drug Testing.

June 26 Meeting Resolutions

The following committees have vacant seats. Sault Tribe members interested in filling these vacancies should submit one letter of intent and three letters of recommendation from other members to Joanne Carr or Linda Grossett, 523 Ashmun St., Sault Ste. Marie MI 49783. Call 906‑635‑6050 with any questions.

Anishinaabe Cultural Committee - five vacancies – three males (4-year term), two female (4-year term)
Child Welfare Committee - four vacancies (4-year term)
Conservation Committee – one vacancy (non fisher) (2-year term)
Election Committee – six vacancies (4-year term)
Higher Education Committee - two vacancies (4-year term)
Health Board – five vacancies (4-year term)
Special Needs/Enrollment Committee - six vacancies (2-year term)

Elder Advisory Committee
Unit I - Sault (4-year term), one regular vacancy, one alternate vacancy
Unit II – Newberry – (4-year term), one regular vacancy
Unit II - Hessel (4-year term), one alternate vacancy
Unit III - St. Ignace (4-year term), one alternate vacancy
Unit V - Munising (4-year term), one regular vacancy, one alternate vacancy

Elder Subcommittee
Unit I - Sault (4-year term), one regular vacancy, one alternate vacancy
Unit ll - Hessel (4-year term), two regular seat vacancies, two alternate seat vacancies
Unit II - Naubinway (4-year term), one alternate seat vacancy
Unit III - St. Ignace (4-year term), two regular seat vacancies
Unit IV- Manistique (4-year term), one regular seat vacancy
Unit V - Munising (4-year term), three regular vacancies, two alternate vacancies
Unit V - Marquette (4-year term), one alternate seat vacancy

Unfortunately, American Indians all too well the trauma induced by federal policy that separated our children from their families and tribal nations. The pedagogy for Indian boarding schools in the late 1800s was, “Kill the Indian to save the man.” There are so many parallels to the current crisis of internment of innocent immigrant children with Indian boarding schools and forced reservation policy. Indian boarding schools even had their own cemeteries.

You would think that in this century we would be far removed from such practices at the hands of the federal government. The President of the United States just announced his intent to withdraw from the United Nations Human Rights Council. Warning signs were evident in the 1930s with German nationalism just before the Holocaust. What further signs do we need to see before the collective consciousness of Americans to understand what is happening?

Tribes are non-partisan. The welfare of our most vulnerable in our territories should not be partisan. It is incumbent upon each and every one of us, the indigenous people and the rest (ironically descendants of immigrants) to adopt a more humane policy with respect to immigrant children.

Located at the tribe’s Odenaang Housing Development off Seymour Rd. in the Soo, Odenaang Storage has storage units available!

• 10-foot by 20-foot units available for $65/mo.
• 12-foot by 25-foot units available for $90/mo.
• 12-foot by 50-foot drive through units available for $160/mo.

Call John McClellan at 906‑635‑6050 to purchase.

Other tribal marijuana laws and policies remain in effect

At this point, the ONLY thing that has changed is that tribal members will no longer face criminal prosecution for medical marijuana if they have complied with the Michigan medical marijuana law.—John Wernet, General Counsel

 

At the June 12 Sault Tribe Board of Directors meeting, the board made a small but significant change to the tribe’s Criminal Code relating to marijuana. Tribal members who use or possess small amounts of marijuana will no longer face criminal prosecution in tribal court if they have a valid state of Michigan medical marijuana card and if their use or possession of the drug is in full compliance with the state’s medical marijuana law.

It is important that tribal members understand what exactly this amendment does and does not do.

If you are a tribal member, the use or possession of marijuana on the reservation is still a tribal crime—unless you have a Michigan medical marijuana card and your marijuana use and possession fully complies with the state law. Tribal members will still face prosecution if they are found with marijuana but do not have a Michigan medical marijuana card or if, for example, they have more marijuana than is allowed under the Michigan law.

But this change to the Criminal Code is the only change that the board has made at this point. There has been no change to any of the other non-criminal marijuana laws and policies that apply on the reservation.

For example, the tribe’s Human Resources policies still list marijuana as a “prohibited drug” for purposes of tribal employment. That policy has not been changed at this time. That means that team members can still be suspended or terminated if they are found with marijuana or if they have a positive drug test for marijuana—even if they possess a medical marijuana card.

Tribal housing still has a “zero tolerance” drug policy and that policy still requires the eviction of tenants who are found to be in possession of marijuana – even if they have a medical marijuana card. And, there has been no change to health center policies or practices related to marijuana—our health center still does not prescribe medical marijuana and, if patients are found to be using marijuana for pain control, they will usually not be able to obtain a prescription for other pain medications from our health center.

It is also important to be aware that possession of marijuana, with or without a medical marijuana card, is still a violation of federal law. Federal prosecutors do not usually bring charges for possession of a small amount of medical marijuana but that is not something the tribe can guarantee or control—the tribe has no say in the decisions of federal prosecutors.

Removing tribal criminal penalties for medical marijuana was a significant step by the board. But it was just a first step and a modest one at that. At this point the ONLY thing that has changed is that tribal members will no longer face criminal prosecution for medical marijuana if they have complied with the Michigan medical marijuana law. It seems likely that the board will be reviewing the tribe’s other laws and policies on marijuana in the future. And, it is possible that some of those other laws and policies may also be changed at some future date. But for now at least, tribal members should exercise caution. They need to understand that, while they may no longer face prosecution for possession of small amounts of medical marijuana, the use or possession of marijuana can still lead to very serious consequences for some members of the tribal community, including tribal employees, residents of tribal housing and patients at the tribal health center.

Powwow apparel sale to benefit the Sault Tribe Gathering and Powwow July 13‑15. Order forms must be submitted no later than June 21, 2018. Please send all forms to the Big Bear Arena (ATTN. Lisa Moran), 2 Ice Circle Drive, Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783, fax them to 906‑632‑6789 or email them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Powwow apparel available are t-shirts, long sleeve shirts and crew neck sweaters, sizes small through 4XL, in men’s and women’s styles. All apparel is black with the powwow logo on the front. Prices and an order form are available at the tribe’s website, saulttribe.com.

Sault Tribe members living in the tax agreement area will not be subject to sales tax. All non-Sault Tribe members and Sault Tribe members living outside of the tax agreement area will be subject to 6 percent sales tax.

If you would prefer to pay by check or money order, please make them payable to “Sault Tribe Powwow.”

 2018 powwow apparel order form

SAULT STE. MARIE—The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians Board of Directors approved a longevity plan at its June 12 meeting to retain valuable employees by celebrating and acknowledging their service to the tribe. Team members with 10 years of service or more will receive an increase to their base wages and they will continue to receive increases every 5 years. An annual recognition luncheon will be held each spring in celebration.

“I am extremely pleased that the board passed this resolution,” Executive Director Christine McPherson said. “It will certainly ease some of the tribe’s pay compression issues. The board’s recognition of our long-term team members is truly appreciated.”

The plan, which includes all team members in the tribe’s government, casinos and enterprises, is effective immediately. Since half the year is over, a recognition luncheon will be held this fall. At that time, employees receiving increases for their length of service will receive a lump sum from January forward in a separate check following the luncheon. Five-year team members will receive a certificate and a gift at the luncheon. Team members with 10 years of service will receive a 1 percent increase to their base salary. Team members with 15 years in receive a 1.5 percent increase, with 20 years a 2 percent increase and so forth.

The date and location of this year’s recognition luncheon will be announced.

At this month's Chippewa County Chapter of Families Against Narcotics (FAN) meeting, come learn about the new needle exchange program and how to use Naloxone kits. The kits will be available for free. The next meeting is at Huntington Bank in Sault Ste. Marie at 6:30 p.m., Thursday, June 21.

FAN—your connection for information, resources, and support. FAN’s mission is saving lives by empowering individuals and communities to prevent and eradicate addiction. We envision a nation free of narcotic addiction and our purpose is to raise awareness of the dangers of prescription narcotics, support those affected by narcotic addiction and erase the stigma of addiction.

For more information visit www.facebook.com/fanchipp.

JKL Bahweting Anishnabe School will be hosting monthly Feeding America Community Mobile Food Trucks through the 2018 year. This is a great resource for our community. Each household will receive approximately 50 pounds of food per distribution. The schedule is as follows:

Kinross Rec Center, 43 Wood Lake Road, Kincheloe, Mich.
• June 12, 2018 - distribution time, 4-6 p.m.

JKL Bahwetjng Anishnabe School, 1301 Marquette Avenue, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.
• July 17, 2018- distribution, 4-6 p.m.
• Aug. 21, 2018 - distribution, 4-6 p.m.
• Sept. 20, 2018- distribution, 5:30-7:30 p.m.**
• Oct. 18, 2018- distribution, 5:30-7:30 p.m.**
• Nov. 16, 2018- distribution, 5:30-7:30 p.m.**
• Dec. 13, 2018- distribution, 5:30-7:30 p.m. **
**Please note that parking lots are not available until 4:15 p.m.

You are encouraged to bring your own boxes, bags, or laundry baskets to carry the food items. The mobiles are a first-come, first-served distribution; we are not able to give preference to anyone. There is no holding a spot in line or cutting in line during these events. JKL Bahweting Anishnabe School is a smoke free campus. Thank you for ensuring these mobiles are successful.

If you have any questions, please contact Kristen Corbiere at 635-5055, ext. 122, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich. —The June 19 Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians Board of Directors meeting and workshop has been canceled due to a consultation with the Department of the Interior on June 19 in New Buffalo, Mich., which the board will attend.

© 2018 - Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians. All Rights Reserved.

Photo by Ken Bosma / CC BY